BIG EARS
Charles Lloyd

Charles Lloyd

“The Sky Will Still Be there Tomorrow” featuring Jason Moran, Larry Grenadier and Eric Harland

Thu   Mar   21   2024 - 9:00 PM Tennessee Theatre

“He’s expansive in his musical discourse yet without a wasted note.” – Wall Street Journal

Lloyd has a legendary history in the music world and could certainly be in a position to slow down and rest on his laurels, but looking back has never been of great interest to this tender warrior. “Go forward,” is his motto as he keeps shifting to a higher, well-calibrated gear. He spent his childhood in Memphis learning piano and saxophone, but by his teens was on the road with Howlin’ Wolf, among other blues legends. A few years later, Lloyd became the director of Chico Hamilton’s group before signing with CBS records where he released his debut album, Discovery!, in 1964. He formed his “classic quartet” in 1966 with drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Keith Jarrett, and bassist Cecil McBee (continued on by Ron McClure). The Quartet’s 1966 live album Forest Flower, recorded at the Monterey Jazz Festival, was one of the most successful jazz recordings of the mid-1960s. At the height of his career in 1970, Lloyd disbanded the quartet and dropped from sight, withdrawing to pursue an inner journey in Big Sur, the wild haven that had previously attracted other artists and seekers. It wasn’t until 1981 that Lloyd moved to break a decade of silence in the jazz world, and since then he has continued releasing records, forming groups, and maintaining an active performance and recording schedule. For this very special performance at Big Ears, Lloyd enlists Jason Moran (piano), Larry Grenadier (bass) and Eric Harland (drums).

BIG EARS
Knoxville, TN · USA

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